Service Dogs of America
Ultimate Dog Sport

SDA

Working Dog Registry

Titling program for protection, obedience, tracking & search dogs

 

Police Dog 3 (PD3) Title

 

Rules and Exercises for the Police Dog 3 (PD3) class. The PD3 class is divided into two parts: The Obedience phase and Protection phase. The obedience and protection routines consist of many advanced training exercises that are considered essential for testing and identifying dogs with the capability to perform police service work. In addition, the exercises required for this class are excellent for providing competition and for promoting dog training. Other benefits of a title from this class will be to improve training related to police service work and to provide a class/title that is a credible test for identifying dogs who possess the necessary skills that would make them good candidates for police service work or for breeding. The PD3 will be one of the main titles used in the SDA Ultimate Dog Sport program for improving breeding characteristics and assisting dog owners who want to produce dogs capable of police service work. Furthermore, the PD3 title requirements are so stringent that this title could be used as an excellent standard for identifying dogs with the ability and training for actual police service work.

                  

Obedience Exercises

Points

Protection Exercises

Points

Handler Gun Fire (muzzled)

10

False Start

10

Carrying of Dog (muzzled)

5

Directed Search

15

Free Heeling Off Leash

25

Defense of Handler

10

Sit & Down out of Motion

10

Muzzle Engagement

25

Recall

15

Courage Test

15

Agility/ Passive Bite

35

Building Search

25

TOTAL POINTS

100

TOTAL POINTS

100

 

General Rules for PD3

A.  Eligibility:  A dog must have earned a PD2 title at a previous trial or be a person that is directly affiliated with police work that is using this title as credible test for certification. Dog must be a least 18 months of age.

B.  Collar: Only one collar is allowed on the dog. Single collars include the following: flat, choke chain, fur saver or similar types.

A.  Leash and leash option: The Obedience phase exercises are performed off leash, with the exception the Handler Gun Fire and Carrying of Dog exercises. All Protection phase exercises are performed off leash. Whenever a leash is removed, the handler must put it away or hang the leash over their shoulder or around their waist with the clasp positioned on the right side of the handler’s body.

A dog must be leashed when:

1.   First reporting to the Judge or Steward;

2.   End of class as soon as all the exercises have been completed;

3.   Whenever a Judge is critiquing the score;

4.   Whenever the Judge instructs the handler to place a leash on the dog.

 

C.  Praise: When reporting to all assigned areas, teams are required to maintain formal heeling with mild praise permissible once arriving at the start position for the next exercise.

D.  Call name: A handler may use the dog’s name prior to any command.

E.  When heeling is required: Dog/handler teams are required to perform formal heeling when reporting to all designated areas.

F.   Heeling & hands: The dog should always heel close to the left knee of the handler and the shoulder blade of the dog should be aligned next to the handler’s knee. The dog must not forge ahead, move to the side, or lag to the rear. A dog that demonstrates positive, energetic, attentive behavior toward the handler is very desirable. The handler should walk freely with both arms moving freely as if the dog wasn’t there. All exercises begin and end in the basic position.

G.  Left about turns: Are to be performed as either the German turn where the dog circles around the handler or back up in place (FCI International/military) where the dogs stays in heel position as the handler turns left. The handler and dog must execute the same turn throughout the obedience phase.

H.  Neutrality test: During its entire performance, a dog is under the neutrality test. A dog that shows extreme aggression, fear, shyness or whose demeanor gives the Judge reason to believe that the dog may not safely be judged may be given a non-qualifying score and excused from the ring and further participation in that trial.

I.     Judge’s instructions: Any place these rules state “Judge’s Instruction” the Judge or Steward can give the instruction.

J.   Qualifying Score to earn or to re-earn title:

1.   OB Phase. Passing the PD3 Obedience Phase does not qualify the dog to earn the OB3 title, because the routine is different from other OB3 titles.

2.    PD3 title. A qualifying score for the PD3 Title requires the passing of the PD3 Obedience Phase with a score of 70 points or more, passing the PD3 Protection phase with a score of 70 points or more and passing the Practical phase with a score of 70 points or more at the same trial.

K.  Scoring note: The score sheet for each exercise has multiple listed features that the Judge is required to assess to determine point deductions. However, the Judge must also assess major or minor imperfection deductions that are not listed on the score sheet for any other deviations from the ideal performance.

L.   Acknowledging the Judge and critique: For the PD3 obedience and protection exercises all handlers are responsible for acknowledging the Judge for instructions on when to report and when concluding the routine. The Judge shall instruct all dog/handler teams where and when to report to receive a critique of the performance and the announcement of the score.

M. Judges note for all evaluations: The Judge will be evaluating the handler and dog on the basis of an ideal performance. All of the listed reasons for imperfection deductions are given as a guide for handlers to have some idea of what is expected. The Judge must assess deductions for other behavior that is not covered or that takes away from the ideal performance. In addition, the Judge will be assessing the dog’s behavior concerning attitude, attention to the handler and the willingness to perform the required exercises. Dogs that display energetic attitude and are attentive and responsive toward their handler will receive the most points.

N.  Knowledge of the routine is scored: The Judge/Steward will announce the exercise to be performed and will then indicate to the handler to start the exercise. Handlers are required to know all exercises and will lose points if performed incorrectly. The point loss will be proportionate to the error and circumstance. This loss can be .5 to 1.5 for minor to as much as 2 to 4 points for major. Because improper use of equipment can be a safety issue or even an advantage, 1/2 of that exercise’s points will be deducted for reporting with the wrong equipment. The equipment will be corrected prior to continuing. Point deduction will be taken at finish of hand shake in reporting to Judge and after the handler acknowledges the Judge for all other exercises.

O.  Pulling a dog from participating in the PD3 Protection phase: When a dog has passed the PD3 Obedience Phase, the handler has the option to continue to the protection phase of the class or pull the dog from competing in the protection phase. The handler should inform the Event Secretary of their decision to pull the dog before the dog is scheduled to run. The dog will be marked “Absent” by the Judge for the PD3 protection phase on the Trials Results Form/Judge’s Book.

Note: All other general rules on our “general rule page” also apply.  See that page here: General Rules

Obedience Phase of Police Dog 3

1.    Handler Gun Fire AND Carrying of Dog (Muzzled). The primary purpose of this exercise is to show that the handler can demonstrate proper control of a dog while firing a weapon. In addition, this exercise is used as a starting point for evaluating temperament and for determining whether the team is suitable for performing the evaluation. Dogs that display extreme shyness or extreme aggression will be excused from further participation.

a)    Judge’s Orders: The orders for this exercise include: muzzle safety check, where and when to start, when the exercise is complete.

b)    Exercise Instructions: The dog handler team will report on leash to a location determined by the Judge; the handler will report with the dog fitted in a style of muzzle suitable for a muzzle engagement with a helper. The Judge will conduct a muzzle safety check that requires the handler showing the Judge the muzzle is properly fitted. The handler with the dog in the basic position will then acknowledge the Judge to start the exercise. The handler with dog in basic position or on a down will announce to anyone that may be hiding to come out and show themselves. After a short pause, the handler will then fire two rounds from a blank pistol. Dog is to maintain the basic position or down, handler then places the pistol on the ground and heels the dog forward ten to fifteen paces.  At this point handler picks up his/her dog and carries it another five to ten paces. Places the dog back on the ground, heels back to the start line and halts, acknowledges the Judge for concluding the exercise and receives instructions on where to report for the next exercise.

c)    Scoring the Gun Fire and Carrying or the Dog Exercise: The Judge is evaluating the proper control of a dog and the behavior of the dog.  The dog should display a neutral, quiet or non-aggressive behavior, the dog must remain in the position assigned. 

1)   Non-qualifying (Zero) scores. The following must be given a zero on this exercise.

a)     Dog is aggressive toward it's handler:

b)     Dog leaves the field; or

c)      The dog is ruled unruly or out of control;

2)   Major and Minor Imperfections. Major or minor imperfection deductions may be assessed for any deviation from the ideal performance.

a.   Dog lags, forges, crowds or is wide during heeling phase;

b.   Dog is slow to respond to the command;

c.   Dog moves, wines/barks or crawls in the basic or down position;

d.   Handler is unable to pick up and carry dog; or

e.   Handler gives extra commands or handler help with body signals.

2.    Heeling off Leash Exercise. The primary purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate the ability of the dog and handler to work smoothly as a team and the ability of the dog to stay in the heel position with distraction on field (helper moving freely about the field).

a)    Judge’s Instructions. The Judge indicates where to start, when the handler is to remove the leash and when to start.

b)    Instructions. The handler and dog (on leash) report to the area specified by the Judge. The Judge informs the handler when to remove the leash. The heeling exercise starts with the handler acknowledging the Judge, and the dog in the basic position. The dog should willingly and freely follow the handler upon the voice command to heel.

c)    Exercise Instructions. The healing exercise is comprised of approximately 150 paces including 12 fast paces, 12 slow paces, 2 left turns, 2 right turns, 2 left about turns and 2 halts.  At least 1 sit out of motion, 1 down out of motion, 1 recall to heel while still moving after leaving your dog in either a sit or down. Also handler must show a recall to front or heel with their dog left at a minimum of 40 paces. The handler then acknowledges the Judge for concluding the exercise.

Note: These required paces and exercises are listed at the minimum amount. They can be performed in any order and repeated more than the required amount if handler so desires.   

The handler is only permitted to use voice commands when starting the exercise, when changing pace, recall and sit or down out of motion. When the handler comes to a stop, the dog should sit in the basic position without being influenced by the handler. During the halt, the handler is not permitted to change the basic position and must not step sideways toward the dog.

d)    Scoring the Heeling Off Leash Exercise: The Judge is evaluating the correctness of the heeling position and the behavior of the dog. Dogs that display positive, energetic attitudes and attentiveness to the handler are most desirable.

1)   Non-qualifying (Zero) scores. The following must be given a zero score on this exercise:

a.     Handler giving the dog constant or repeated extra commands or signals;

b.     Handler slapping the leg or snapping fingers repeatedly;

c.     Handler continually adapting pace to dog;

d.     Dog moves a substantial distance away from the place where it was sitting/downing;

e.     Handler moves from the stationary position on the recall;

f.       Unqualified heeling;

g.     Dog breaks or leaves the handler’s side and cannot regain its composure and resume heeling;

2)    Major and Minor Imperfections. Imperfections may be major or minor depending on the extent of the following:

a.     Handler moving forward and then giving a “heel” command shall be penalized a major imperfection;

b.     Handler giving extra commands or signals;

c.     Dog moves out of the basic heel position before a command from the handler;

d.     Dog anticipating command;

e.     Dog crowding the handler, forging, heeling wide, heeling in an improper position, lagging, poor sitting on the halts, sniffing and any other additional heeling imperfections;

f.       Dog fails to stop and sit automatically in the proper basic position each time the handler is required to “Halt”;

g.     Incomplete sit (hovering/space between butt and ground);

h.     Failure to change pace by the dog or handler during the fast or slow portion of the heeling exercise;

i.       Dog moves a substantial distance in the down by crawling or creeping;

j.       Dog is very slow coming to the handler on recall

k.     Dog does the wrong finish (must tell Judge/Steward what finish at start of routine)

l.       Lacks natural smoothness; or

The agility equipment requirements are listed on equipment page.

3.    Agility/Passive Bite Exercise. The primary purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate the dog’s ability to perform climbing and jumping over obstacles under distraction. A passive helper will be standing 10 paces from obstacles.

a)    Judge’s Instructions. The Judge indicates where and when to start, and when the exercise is complete.

b)    Exercise Instructions. Handler must execute all 4 obstacles (incline wall, window jump, high jump, fence jump). Two shall be executed by heeling up to and jumping the dog over.  The remaining two will be executed by leaving the dog behind one of them in either sit or down and calling the dog over the two obstacles. There will be a passive helper standing within 10 paces of the jumps.  After completing all 4 obstacles handler will then turn his/her attention to the helper. Ordering the helper put his/her hands up, or dog will be sent. Helper will not respond in any way; handler will then send the dog to apprehend the suspect (helper). The helper shall briefly fight the dog, and on command of the Judge freeze's up. When the helper stops resisting, the dog should release the grip and perform its disengagement response. If the dog has not released the grip, the handler is permitted a release command and perform its disengagement response. The dog may perform any of the following: a release hold and bark, a release sit or down guard or a release and return to the handler’s heel position. If the dog is performing a guard the handler is allowed to walk up to the side of the dog and command the dog back into the basic position, attach the leash and acknowledge the Judge for concluding the exercise and receive instructions on where to report for the next exercise.

Note: The handler may give a single jump command each time the dog has to cross an obstacle. The dog is required to follow a direct path that requires the dog to successfully negotiate each obstacle. The obstacles are each placed approximately 8 to 10 paces apart in a straight line. The Judge is responsible for approving the set-up of the obstacles and location. Each obstacle is worth two points. The height and obstacle requirements can be found under equipment requirements.  The handler should be aware of position of Judge/Steward when send dog for passive bite and set it up in a manor not to endanger them.

c)    Scoring the Agility/Passive Bite. Scoring of this exercise begins when the Judge acknowledges the handler to start. The Judge is evaluating the entire exercise to determine the rating the performance deserves. Dogs that demonstrate positive, energetic, attentive behavior toward the handler and strong willingness to perform the exercise are most desirable.

1)   Non-qualifying (Zero) scores. The following must be given a zero on this exercise.

a.     Dog follows the handler and doesn’t perform any agility obstacles;

b.     Dog breaks and comes to the handler without performing any agility obstacles;

c.     Dog leaves the field;

d.     Dog will not grip the passive helper;

e.     The dog is ruled unruly or out of control;

f.       The dog will not release the grip;

g.     The dog engages the passive helper prior to being sent; or

h.     The dog engages the helper but releases the grip prior to the out command and will not engage again.

2)   Major and Minor Imperfections. Major or minor imperfection deductions may be assessed for any deviation from the ideal performance.

a.     Dog lags, forges, crowds or is wide during heeling phase;

b.     Dog is slow to respond to the command;

c.     Dog hesitates to perform the agility obstacle;

d.     Dog doesn’t successfully negotiate each agility obstacle;

e.     Dog’s feet touch or tick the window jump, rail jump or solid jump; or

f.       Handler gives extra commands or handler helps with body signals.

Conclusion and critique of the PD 3 Obedience Routine. The Judge indicates a location for dog/handler team to report for their score and critique. The handler reports with his/her dog on leash and halts with dog maintaining a “sit” in the basic position, handler should then command their dog into a “down” position while waiting for their score and critique. Dogs should display proper control during the critique and when exiting from the field. As much as a two point deduction can be assessed for dogs that display lack of control during the critique or when entering or leaving the field.

Protection Phase of the PD3

The Police Dog 3 (PD3) requires reality-based training exercises directly related to police dog training. The first portion of the PD3 class is performed at the club field or stadium that is conducting the trial. The building search can be held at any convenient building. All of the exercises required for this routine are performed off leash and are some of the most advanced protection and apprehension performance exercise required in SDA Ultimate Dog Sport program. Each exercise in the PD3 class is an excellent venue for testing a dog’s nerves, tenacity, athletic ability and overall temperament for performing any type of advanced protection or apprehension service.

Furthermore, the PD3 is a major tool in the SDA Ultimate Dog Sport program by offering competition, improving service dog breeding standards and for promoting service protection training. Dogs that excel at performing in this class should be excellent candidates for protection or apprehension service work.

General Rules

A.  Evaluating Grips and Courage- Drive. The Judge evaluates grips and courage drive on the following criteria: the dog should demonstrate a strong desire to want to engage the helper; the grip should be full as possible and should be maintained in the same location. Dogs that grip full initially but lose part of the grip due to shaking and pulling are not faulty; dogs that display this type of behavior may actually earn points and be rewarded for demonstrating courage drive and strong willingness to engage the helper. However, if a dog loses part of the grip due to shaking or pulling, the dog should re-grip as soon as the opportunity presents itself. Dogs that take full grips but don’t display courage drive or strong desire to challenge the helper must not receive full points. In addition, dogs that hackle up, growl excessively, show any form of avoidance, loosen their grip while being challenged by the helper or take shallow canine grips are faulty. Judges award full points to dogs that clearly demonstrate firm gripping, courage drive, overwhelming enthusiasm and commitment to engage the helper. In addition, Judges award more points to dogs that demonstrate positive, energetic working attitudes while performing. However, control and willingness to respond to commands of the handler are critical. In summary, Judges reward dog/handler teams who can demonstrate a great attitude and a precision performance.

B.  Outs. If the dog, during the gripping stages of the exercise refuses to release the grip a maximum of 3 commands are allowed for each gripping exercise. If the dog does not release the grip on the third command, the Judge shall instruct the handler to quickly go to and control the dog. The dog is excused from further participation. A 3-point deduction shall be given for any extra commands to “let go” used during the exercise.

C.  For all Police Dog titles, the decoy must wear a full bite suit.

D.  Lower body or inner arm grips. The handler must indicate on the entry form that the dog is trained in lower body and inner arm gripping. Helpers who are qualified to work lower and inner arm body-gripping dogs and will make the necessary adjustments for conducting the helper work. All gripping exercises allow lower and upper body gripping.

E.  Disengagement Exercise. A disengagement exercise is defined as the behavioral response the dog demonstrates after releasing the grip from the helper. The dog may perform any of the following: a release hold and bark, a release sit or down guard or a release and return to the handler’s heel position.

Protection Phase Exercises

1.    False Start Exercise: The primary purpose of this exercise is for the dog/handler team to demonstrate a non-threatening encounter with helper and when the helper changes from being friendly to aggressive behavior; the handler must demonstrate control over the dog. Maintaining the basic position or down while the helper flees.

a)    Judge’s Orders: The Judge will indicate where and when to start, when the helper will appear, when the exercise is complete and where to report for the next exercise.

b)    Instructions: The handler will report off leash to a designated area determined by the Judge to start the exercise; once arriving, the handler will look for the Judge’s indication to start the exercise. The exercise starts when the handler makes his or her announcement with the dog in the basic position or down by the handler side behind a start line. A helper that has been hidden in a blind near midfield starts to walk out. Once the handler sees the helper, the handler will make an announcement for the helper to stop or the dog will be sent; the helper will continue and may verbally exchange with handler; however, when the helper reaches the center of the field, he or she will start running away from handler for a distance of 10 paces. The helper will stop, turn and face the handler and remain standing still. The handler remains with the dog in the basic position while the Judge dismisses the helper. The handler acknowledges the Judge and waits for instructions on where to report for the next exercise.

c)    Scoring the False Start Exercise: The exercise will be evaluated on the handler’s ability to control the dog. The dog should display a neutral, quiet or non-aggressive behavior, the dog must remain in the position assigned.  Control is the main criteria of the exercise when evaluating for full points.

1)   Non-Qualifying (Zero Scores), the following imperfections must be given a zero score:

a.   The dog moving forward across the start line:

b.   The dog engages the helper;

c.   The dog leaves the field;

d.   Any rough treatment of the dog by the handler; or

e.   Dog is unruly or out of control.

2)   Major or Minor Imperfections. The following imperfections may be major or minor based on the deviation from the ideal performance.

a.   Dog is restless and moves from the basic position;

b.   Dog receives extra commands during any portion of the exercises;

c.   Dog shows avoidance toward the helper;

d.   Dog’s confidence or enthusiasm is lacking during the distractions;

e.   Dog is growling or hackling up during the unruly portion;

f.     Dog barks continuously during the handlers warning;

g.   The dog is slow to respond to any commands;

h.   Any double commands by the handler; or

i.     Any deviation from an ideal performance will be considered a major or minor imperfection based on the deviation from the ideal.

2.    Directed Search Find & Bite and Defense of Handler: The primary purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate that a handler can perform a directed search of three hiding places not containing a helper, call the dog back and then redirect the dog to a new area that will contain the helper. Once arriving at the helper’s location, the helper will flee and the dog must grip, out, defend the handler during an attack with another grip on the helper, perform another out and remain under control during the dismissal of the helper.

a)    Judges Orders: The Judge will place the helper in a hiding spot. The Judge will instruct the handler on when and where the exercise will be performed, in what order the hiding places will be searched, when to begin the search, when the helper will cease resisting or challenging the dog, when the handler is to dismiss the helper, when the exercise is complete and where to report for the next exercise.

b)    Instructions: The handler, with the dog in the basic position, will acknowledge the Judge to start.  Once the helper is hidden, the Judge will indicate to the handler to conduct a Directed Search & Find and Bite exercise. There will be six hiding places (blinds or anything that a helper can be hidden in) on the field. Hiding places will be numbered from the handler, left to right. Three on the right side and three on the left side, staggered or across from each other (placed at Judge’s discretion).

The handler will know where the helper is and the dog must be sent to that place last. The handler must search the other places in the order specified by the Judge. Dog must search 3 places before being sent to the find blind. The handler will move down the middle of the field while directing his/her dog's search. After the dog reaches the first hiding place and searches, the handler call the dog back and direct the dog to the next hiding place.  The handler does this for all three empty hiding places, then sends the dog to the place containing the helper. The handler is allowed to use the dog’s name and a recall command after each search. When the dog is sent to the hiding place containing the helper, as the dog approaches the helper will flee.

The dog should immediately grip the helper and stop or slow down the escape. A verbal command to instruct the dog to engage is allowed. The helper will drive and challenge the dog on the grip. The Judge will instruct the helper when to stop challenging the dog and when the helper becomes still, the dog should release the grip and perform its disengagement response.  A command to release the grip is permitted. The handler will acknowledge the Judge, approach the dog and give a single verbal command to bring the dog back into the basic position.

For the disarm exercise, the handler places their dog into a down and guard position three to four paces from the helper. This may be done by either telling the helper to step back to the correct position or by heeling the dog to the correct position. Once the helper is at the proper distance and the dog is in the down guard position, the handler instructs the helper to place their arms up for the disarm exercise. The handler begins the disarm exercise by searching the helper from the back area for about four to five seconds and then moving to the side of the helper opposite of the dog for additional searching. Once the handler is in position to conduct the second part of the search, the Judge signals the helper to attack the handler. The helper then turns and physically grabs hold of the handler. At this time the dog should recognize the helper’s attack and immediately grip the helper. The helper remains holding on to the handler until the dog has firmly gripped but once the dog grips, the helper releases the handler and starts challenging the dog with driving, yelling, or other forms of resisting.

Once the Judge is satisfied with the helper’s resisting, the Judge instructs the helper to stop resisting and stand still. When the helper stops resisting, the dog should release the grip and perform its disengagement response. The handler has remained in a stationary position where the helper attack occurred and waits until the helper has stopped resisting. If the dog has not released the grip, the handler is permitted a release command. Once the dog releases its grip on the helper and performs its disengagement response, the handler acknowledges the Judge for performing a dismissal of the helper exercise.

For the dismissal exercise, the handler approaches the helper and commands the dog into the basic position. The handler instructs the helper to move to a distance of three to four paces from the dog or if the dog was called to the heel position the handler should heel the dog to a position three to four paces from the helper. Either way, after reaching this distance, the handler looks to the Judge to conclude the exercise and receive instructions on where to report for the next exercise. The Judge will not dismiss the helper until the handler is heeling away to report for the next exercise.

c)    Scoring the Directed Search & Find Bite and Defense of Handler Exercise: This exercise will be primarily evaluated on the control and intensity of the search. The dog should directly search the all areas and then when called by the handler should return promptly and directly.

1)   Non-Qualifying (Zero Scores) The exercise must be scored a zero for any of the following:

a)    The dog goes to the find blind without completing the other 3 searches;

b)    The dog cannot be directed to the blind containing the helper;

c)     Dog comes off the grip and refuses to re-engage the helper;

d)    Dog does not release the grip after three commands; or

e)    The dog demonstrates avoidance of the helper by leaving the field.

2)   Major and Minor Deductions: the following imperfections may be major or minor based on the extent of the deviation of an ideal performance.

a)    The precision and correctness of the search.

b)    The dog response to the call off command.

c)     The attitude and enthusiasm the dog displays performing the exercises.

d)    Dog lacks enthusiasm and courage during defending against the attack by the helper.

e)    The smoothness and knowledge of the exercise requirements; or

f)      This is not an exhaustive list and any deviation from an ideal performance could be a major or minor deduction based on the extent of the deviation.

3.    Muzzle Engagement Test: The primary purpose of this test is to determine the dog’s willingness or capability to engage a helper in regular clothing after verbal stimulation from the handler. The dog will be expected to make contact with a helper on command and then be called off; next, the dog must engage a helper lying on the ground and must stay engaged until called off or removed from the helper by the handler.

a)    Judge’s Orders: The orders for this exercise include; a muzzle safety check, where and when to start, when to call the dog off from the first engagement, when to start the second muzzle exercise, when to pick the dog up from the second engagement and when the exercise is complete.

b)    Exercise Instructions: The dog and handler team will report on leash to a location determined by the Judge with the dog fitted in a style of muzzle suitable for a muzzle engagement with a helper. The handler must perform a safety check in view of the Judge demonstrating the muzzle is securely fastened. The handler will then remove the leash, position themselves or command the dog into basic position and acknowledge the Judge for the start of the exercise.

A helper dressed in street clothing will be positioned six paces from the handler. The handler will tell the helper to come closer so they can talk. Hearing this request, the helper will become agitated and verbally defiant (no foul language) pacing left to right maintaining the same distance from the handler. 3 seconds after becoming defiant the helper will place one hand in a pocket and simultaneously make an aggressive move toward the handler. This is the handler’s cue to command the dog to engage the helper. There is no penalty for the dog reacting on its own once the helper moves aggressively towards handler.  After the dog makes contact with the helper, the helper will challenge the dog for 3 – 5 seconds at which time the Judge will order the helper to halt and remain still. The handler will then give the dog its disengagement command. When the dog is back in the basic position, the handler acknowledges the Judge to complete the first exercise.

The Judge will then instruct the helper to lie down on the ground in preparation for the next exercise. When the helper is ready, the Judge will instruct the handler to start the next muzzle engagement exercise. With the dog, still in basic position, the handler will instruct the helper to get up from the ground and show his hands (the helper will refuse verbally in an unruly manner), the handler will warn the helper if they don’t get up and show their hands the dog will be sent. After this warning the handler sends the dog and the dog should engage the helper using the muzzle. After 3 -5 seconds of muzzle engagement, the handler comes in to remove the dog with the leash or collar. The handler then commands the dog back into the basic position and acknowledges the Judge to conclude the exercise. The helper will remain lying down until excused by the Judge.

Note to Helpers: During the first exercise, when the dog is sent, be sure to protect yourself but upon contact give slightly to the impact then push the dog back while yelling. For the second exercise, when the dog approaches, again protect yourself but upon contact give slightly to the impact and yell. Don’t kick or grab the dog.

Muzzle Safety Check: The handler should grab the muzzle underneath and gently but firmly lift the dog straight up by the muzzle so that the dog’s feet are off the ground a couple of inches. Next, place a hand under the top strap of the muzzle with the palm of the hand facing up. Grasp the strap and twist your hand toward you, trying to pry the muzzle off.  Do this gently but firmly taking care not to wrench the dog’s neck. The muzzle should stay securely fastened during each of these checks. If the Judge does not feel the muzzle safety check was done adequately, he or the Steward may do the safety check themselves.

c)    Scoring the Muzzle Engagement Exercise: The Judge will be evaluating the dog’s performance mainly on its willingness to use the muzzle to make contact with helper. Dogs that stay fully engaged until being called off will earn the most points.

1)   Non-Qualifying (Zero) Scores; the dog must be given a zero score for any of the following:

a.   The dog doesn’t engage the helper on both exercises;

b.   The dog cannot be called off;

c.   The dog demonstrates avoidance of the helper or fear; or

d.   Dogs that receive a zero score on this portion of the PD3 will be excused from continuing the examination.

2)   Major and Minor Deductions; imperfection deductions may be major or minor depending on the extent of the deviation of an ideal performance.

a.   The dog doesn’t stay fully engaged with helper until being called off;

b.   The dog is very slow reacting to the call off command;

c.   The dog is lacking in enthusiasm while engaging the helper;

d.   The dog engages but mainly just barks at the helper;

e.   The dog’s obedience during the exercise is lacking;

f.     Handler skills are lacking;

g.   Any deviation from an ideal performance that is not listed could be a major or minor deduction.

4.    Courage Test, Voice Commands, “Warning Announcement” and Send Command Exercises. The primary element of this exercise is to demonstrate a dog’s willingness and ability to engage a helper from a long distance away from the handler. This exercise is designed to test the courage of the dog as it approaches a helper making direct threatening gestures, yelling and tossing object (sweat shirt, jacket or other soft object). Then engage the attacking helper, and withstand two stick hits and drive during the attack. The dog should display a strong desire to engage the helper and a willingness to respond to commands by the handler from a distance. The exercise is concluded by the handler approaching the dog and performing a disarm and transport exercise back to the Judge.

a)    Judge’s Instructions. The Judge indicates where and when to start the exercise, when the helper is to come and attack, when the handler sends the dog, when the helper ceases challenging the dog, where the transport is to be performed, dismissal of the helper when the exercise is complete and where to report for the next exercise.

b)    Exercise Instructions. The handler heels the dog off leash to a designated area; the handler acknowledges the Judge and the Judge then signals for the helper to come out. When the handler sees, the helper come out, the handler gives a verbal warning to the helper to stop the attack or the dog shall be sent. Once the helper turns up the field and starts making a direct approach toward the handler, the handler watches for the Judge’s signal to send the dog, which has been waiting in the basic position or held by the collar and encouraged by the handler to engage the helper. The handler follows the dog down the field until reaching a distance approximately five to ten paces from the helper. The helper continues forward in a threatening manner using both physical and verbal threats.

Note: When the dog reaches a distance of approximately seven paces from the helper, the helper throws the object, ceases threatening the dog, turns quickly and moves in the opposite direction from the dog, presenting either a left or right triceps arm presentation for the dog to target. The dog must immediately grip firmly. When the dog has gripped the helper then drives or resists the dog applying two stick hits.  Upon the Judge’s signal the helper shall cease resisting. The dog then releases the grip and performs its disengagement exercise; the handler’s command to “let go” is permitted. The handler remains in the required position until signaled by the Judge to approach the dog for performing a disarm exercise. The disarm exercise consist of the handler positioning the dog into a down position approximately three to four paces from the helper; the required distance can be obtained by heeling the dog to the proper distance or instructing the helper to move to the necessary location. After the helper is in the correct location for performing a disarm exercise, the handler commands the command the dog into the down guarding position and then commands the helper to place his/her arms up. The handler then leaves the dog, goes to the helper to obtain any weapon, returns back to the dog, commands the dog to sit, then instructs the helper to move out to the Judge; the handler then performs a close transport of about fifteen paces to the Judge, or after conducting the search, the handler may call the dog to the heel position three to five paces directly behind the helper, then start the transport. The handler then performs a close back transport of about fifteen paces to the Judge; the handler and dog should follow the helper at a distance around three to five paces. Once the helper reaches the Judge, the handler commands the helper to halt and turn and face the dog. The handler then commands the dog into a down position; leaves the dog and presents the weapon to the Judge. The handler then returns to his or her dog, commands the dog to sit and attaches the leash. The handler remains with the dog in the basic position while the Judge dismisses the helper. The handler acknowledges the Judge and waits for instructions on where to report for the next exercise.

Lower body grips. Dogs are allowed lower body grips the helper’s movements and bite presentations may be altered on the courage test to accommodate lower body gripping; however, the threats prior to the grip must be the same.

c)    Scoring the Courage Test Exercise. The Judge is primarily evaluating the courage instinct of the entire routine. Dogs that display superior courage drives, firm grips and spirited enthusiasm should receive the most points. In addition, the dog’s responses to the handler’s command are very important for receiving maximum points.

1)   Non-qualifying (Zero) scores. The following must be given a zero score for this exercise:

a.    Dog doesn’t engage the helper;

b.    Dog comes off the grip and does not re-engage the helper; or

c.     Rough treatment by the handler to make the dog follow commands.

2)   Major or Minor Imperfections. Imperfection deductions may be major or minor depending on the extent of the deviation from the ideal performance.

a.    Extra commands (verbal or physical);

b.    Dog lacks intensity to make contact with helper;

c.     Dog lacks intensity during the gripping phases of the routine;

d.    Dog’s speed and power displayed during the long attack strike;

e.    The response of dog to obedience commands by the handler;

f.      The attitude or demeanor the dog displayed throughout the routine;

g.    Handler’s ability to demonstrate proper knowledge of the routine; or

h.    Overall smoothness of the routine.

5.   Building Search with a Find and Bark Exercise: The primary purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate that a handler could arrive at a building of some type and conduct a free search with his or her dog and find a hidden helper. The dog must locate the helper and indicate to the handler the helper’s location by barking.

a)    Judge’s Orders. The Judge will indicate to the handler where and when to start, when to go to the dog for a call off or pick up exercise, when the exercise is complete and where to report for hearing the score and critique of the performance.

Special Preparation. The building type could be a mobile home, small house or any structure of similar size or the building could be a large house, storage facility or a portion of a large building. Buildings with slick floors are most desirable. Eight minutes is allowed for small buildings and as much as twelve minutes for large. The structure will first be contaminated by several people and dogs walking through the structure at least 30 minutes prior to the first search if the same building is being used for several searches.

The helper must be hidden for five minutes prior to the dog entering for the search. The helper will be in civilian clothing hidden in a location that prevents the dog from making physical contact with the helper such as a closet, bathroom, cage, loft etc. There will be no helper stimulation.

b)    Exercise Instructions. The handler will report to a secure building of some type that has been approved by the Judge. The dog/handler team will report on leash to the Judge and will be told what door to enter first to conduct the building search. The handler will then report to the designated entrance to the building, and will give a warning announcement for the helper to come out or the dog will be sent. The dog must remain quiet enough so that the announcement could reasonably be heard by the helper.

After the handler announcement, the dog is sent off leash, into the building to conduct a free search with the handler remaining by the entrance for approximately 10 seconds. The handler and Judge may then enter the area the dog has cleared and then work as team, however the dog should conduct a free search of the building until the hidden helper is located. The handler is allowed to help direct the dog but the dog should search freely with handler staying in secured or cleared areas. Excessive handler assistance while directing is faulty. When the dog locates the helper, the dog should start barking and remain at the location until the handler arrives on the scene. Once the handler hears the dog indicate, the handler and Judge will enter the building if they have been waiting at the opening. The handler will approach the dog, attach the leash and then give commands for the helper to come out from hiding. The exercise ends when the helper comes out of hiding. The handler then acknowledges Judge for completion of the exercise. The Judge will then instruct the handler on where to report to hear the score or critique of the performance.

c)    Scoring the Building Search. This exercise will be to primarily evaluate the dog’s ability to quickly and accurately locate the hidden helper with its display of barking. Scoring will be based on how long it takes the dog to find the helper, the dog’s intensity and concentration while searching, the intensity of the barking and the accuracy of locating the helper.

1)   Non-Qualifying or (Zero) Scores. The following must be given a zero score if they occur:

a.   The dog is unable to locate the helper and searches without any intensity within the time frame;

b.   The dog keeps coming back to the handler and lacks intensity in the search;

c.   The dog is ruled unresponsive to conducting searching; or

d.   Dog falsely indicates the location of the helper.

2)   Major or Minor Deductions. The following imperfections may be a major or minor based on the deviation from an ideal performance:

a.   Locating the helper is near the end of the time limit;

b.   Barking is lacking or weak during the find and bark exercise;

c.   Dog comes back to the handler and has to be resent to search;

d.   Intensity and concentration of the dog is lacking;

e.   The dog indication is not precise;

f.     The dog is difficult to call off or pick up; or

g.   Any deviation from an ideal performance that is not listed could be a major or minor deduction based on the deviation of the imperfection.

Concluding the Routine: The Judge will inform the handler where to report for critiques and announcement of the score. The handler reports with dog on leash and halt with dog maintaining a “sit” in the basic position, handler should then command their dog into a “down” position while waiting for their score and critique. Dog should display proper control during the critique and when exiting from the field. As much as a two point deduction can be assessed for dogs that display lack of control during the critique or when entering or leaving the field. The Judge will have the option of providing a detailed critique, a short summary, or simply announcing the score of the performance of each handler and dog team. Handlers may request an individual critique or review of the performance with the Judge if a critique is not provided. The Judge will determine the time and place for any individual reviews.

Note: The Judge’s score is final. Respect and good sportsmanship must be displayed by all parties at all times